Sainte-Chapelle, Paris

The Sainte-Chapelle was built by King Louis IX in the 1240s to hold the crown of thorns, a relic from the Crucifixion. The enormous stained glass windows that make up its walls are filled with biblical scenes.

Green Men, Rochester Cathedral (Kent)

Leaves sprout from the nose of the first, the ears of the second, and the mouth of the third face on this medieval tomb in Rochester Cathedral. The fourth creature looks like these examples in the Luttrell Psalter.

St George, Heydour Parish Church (Lincolnshire)
This image of St George can be found in a window in the parish church of Heydour. The red cross on a white background identifies him as St George. His feast day is April 23. The window was made around 1360 and paid for by Sir Henry Scrope, the baron of Masham.

St George, Heydour Parish Church (Lincolnshire)

This image of St George can be found in a window in the parish church of Heydour. The red cross on a white background identifies him as St George. His feast day is April 23. The window was made around 1360 and paid for by Sir Henry Scrope, the baron of Masham.

Markenfield Hall (Yorkshire)

The fortified manor house was a sign of social status for its owners, the Markenfield. Its fortifications could only be built with the permission of the king. This permission was acquired in 1310 by John Markenfield, a priest in the nearby church of Ripon Minster. In addition to its parapet, Markenfield Hall is also defended by a moat.

Many families of English knights fortified their houses around the same time as the Markenfields. This shows that their social status and identity, which had earlier depended on connections with their lords, had grown more independent. Another expression of this independence was burial in the parish church instead of the monastery of the lord.

A number of shields on one of the walls of the courtyard formerly displayed the heraldry of families with close ties to the Markenfields. The heraldry carved on the Markenfield tombs in Ripon Minster is still visible. It shows connections with powerful Yorkshire families such as the Nevilles and the Scropes.

Cooling Parish Church (Kent)

The medieval church is located just down the road from the castle. Some members of the family that lived in the castle were buried in the parish church in the sixteenth century, while the earlier lords and ladies of the castle were buried at Cobham.

The south aisle of the church had an aisle against its east wall. The hole or squint cut through this wall creates a direct line of sight between this altar and the high altar in the chancel. As a result, the priest in the aisle could synchronize his mass with the priest at the high altar.

Cooling Castle (Kent)

The castle was built by the Cobham family in the late fourteenth century. At this time castles and fortified houses were important symbols of wealth and power for families of knights like the Cobhams. The shield above the gate displayed their coat of arms to show that it was their castle.

Medieval Brass Monument, Cooling Parish Church (Kent)
This medieval brass marked the grave of Faith Brook (d. 1508). The inscription identifies her as the daughter of John Brook, lord of Cobham. The Brook family of Cobham owned Cooling Castle, just down the road from the church.

Medieval Brass Monument, Cooling Parish Church (Kent)

This medieval brass marked the grave of Faith Brook (d. 1508). The inscription identifies her as the daughter of John Brook, lord of Cobham. The Brook family of Cobham owned Cooling Castle, just down the road from the church.

Defaced Monument, Cooling Parish Church (Kent)
The ghostly outlines of four figures are still visible on this stone slab but the brass images that once formed part of the monument are long gone. It looks like the figure second from the left was facing the viewer while the other three were facing this figure. There was also an object above the figures and the rectangular shape below shows where there was an inscription.

Defaced Monument, Cooling Parish Church (Kent)

The ghostly outlines of four figures are still visible on this stone slab but the brass images that once formed part of the monument are long gone. It looks like the figure second from the left was facing the viewer while the other three were facing this figure. There was also an object above the figures and the rectangular shape below shows where there was an inscription.

Presentation in the Temple, Faversham Parish Church (Kent)
Wall paintings of Christ’s presentation in the Temple are very rare in England. This example from Faversham dates to the early fourteenth century. From left to right the figures are Joseph, Mary holding the baby Jesus, and Simeon. Joseph is shown wearing the type of hat traditionally used to identify Jewish people in medieval art.
February 2 was the date of the feast of the Presentation, also known as the Purification of the Blessed Virgin and Candlemas. The name Candlemas refers to the processions with blessed candles that were made to celebrate the feast. It is forty days after Christmas.
For a biblical account of the presentation, see Luke 2:22-38. Mary and Joseph took Jesus to the Temple in Jerusalem in order to make a sacrifice of two pigeons in accordance with the law of Moses. Simeon was an old man who recognized Jesus as the messiah that he has been expecting.

Presentation in the Temple, Faversham Parish Church (Kent)

Wall paintings of Christ’s presentation in the Temple are very rare in England. This example from Faversham dates to the early fourteenth century. From left to right the figures are Joseph, Mary holding the baby Jesus, and Simeon. Joseph is shown wearing the type of hat traditionally used to identify Jewish people in medieval art.

February 2 was the date of the feast of the Presentation, also known as the Purification of the Blessed Virgin and Candlemas. The name Candlemas refers to the processions with blessed candles that were made to celebrate the feast. It is forty days after Christmas.

For a biblical account of the presentation, see Luke 2:22-38. Mary and Joseph took Jesus to the Temple in Jerusalem in order to make a sacrifice of two pigeons in accordance with the law of Moses. Simeon was an old man who recognized Jesus as the messiah that he has been expecting.

Cobham Parish Church (Kent)

The church was the traditional burial place of the Cobham family in the late fourteenth century. John, the third lord of Cobham, spent a large sum of money to hire a group of priests to pray for the souls of his family members. The priests lived in a square building with a courtyard just to the south of the church. At the same time John Cobham also built the family residence, Cooling Castle.